6 Life Lessons You Can Learn From Students

 I continue to have an insatiable thirst for learning. I guess it’s what keeps me young.

 I also like to share motivational and inspirational quotes and tidbits with others, in addition to my content on marketing and sales. More importantly, I believe in helping others and, in particular, those who have helped me along the way. This all leads to this blog post.

Over thirty years ago, I had the distinct pleasure of being interviewed and hired by Jack Driscoll. Jack is a true icon among those who have ever been involved in the electronics industry or in high-tech. More importantly, he is someone who greatly influenced the career success I achieved, my ability to see the world, and providing me with the opportunity of meeting so many outstanding individuals from many of the world’s largest companies.

While attending a company function at Jack’s home many years ago, I had the distinct pleasure of meeting his daughter, Kim. At that time, she was a young college student. Kim has since gone on to become one of the most influential people in education through her co-founding of the Ron Clark Academy and her many speaking engagements to educators and business organizations throughout the world. She, along with Ron and the others at the Atlanta school, have trained thousands of educators who are now using their techniques at their schools.

In running into Jack at a local supermarket last week, I learned of the upcoming release of Kim’s book which intrigued me. Knowing Kim and her accomplishments, I’m sure it will be good and something which will touch many in academia and beyond. What’s more, her experience in working with Ron Clark and others in changing the way children are educated and the feedback she has received from her students has been extensive. Although from young students, many of the lessons she has learned are directly applicable to business. It is just a few of these that I’d like to share with you at this time.

1)Solving the Puzzle: The children in Kim’s life have taught her that our lives are like a jigsaw puzzle: every piece is jagged and awkward when studied in isolation, but has a clear place and purpose as the picture begins to take shape. If we seek to nurture our talents and use them to their fullest, we will learn that each of us is a one-of-a-kind limited edition who has great purpose in whatever capacity we serve. 

2)Realizing the Power of Tenacity: It is easy to become frustrated when we don’t see immediate results after pouring so much effort and time into our work. When this happens, it is important to remember the power of tenacity: every word, every deed, every outpouring of love has the potential to instill something that will later empower an organization in meaningful ways.

3)Creating Chemistry that Changes the Climate: The most powerful relationships occur when we willingly seek to understand others wholeheartedly. The chemistry we create with other people is the primary element that affects our ability to guide others, mold them, and help them find success.

4)Setting Expectations… and Meeting Them: We must believe in every individual’s ability to achieve greatness: lowering expectations doesn’t help those who struggle, but rather it hinders them. Every person needs to be “seen” not as they are, but as what they can become.

5)Uplifting Others: Every person needs to feel beautiful, comforted, valued, and cherished.  We must know that we matter and that we have significance. By serving others, we elevate not only their self-perception but also ourselves.

 6)Knowing What Matters: When we stop to appreciate the blessings all around us, we begin to understand the limitless possibilities for our lives.  By spending time with others who have little and love much, we realize how others find abundant joy, despite their dire circumstances. Fellowship, love, and laughter—they are available to us all.

Kim certainly has many more points to share that can be applied to business. These are all contained in her upcoming book which is now available for pre-order:

Crash Course The Life Lessons My Students Taught Me

Whether you’re in education or business, or want to learn more from someone who has really had a profound impact on our society and the way that children are being taught, and has countless success stories to validate her methods, it’s worth listening to what Kim had to say. I know I have and will continue to do so.

A Salute Worth Tweeting About On Social Media

As someone who endlessly searches the Internet and the media for inspirational stories and motivational quotes,  it isn’t often that I find one that results in my immediate action. This case was different!

 

Salute Seen Around The World

Over the weekend, I saw a compelling story about Josh Hargis, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan.   I had previously noticed the photo of his famous salute seen around the world late last year and it resonated with me, but to see his updated story on TV and witness his latest efforts to move forward with his life was really compelling.   The story began on October 6th, 2013 when Josh, along with members of 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, were conducting operations in Southern Afghanistan.  During the operation  multiple  Improvised Explosive  Devices  were  employed  by  the  enemy.  The overwhelming damage caused by the insurgents left four US Soldiers dead and a multitude of wounded.  Josh  was severely wounded, losing both his legs from the knees down.  He is now undergoing extensive rehabilitation in Texas.

Although my military “service” was limited to a couple of years in the Air Force ROTC, I have always been supportive of our veterans and the sacrifices that they continue to make on a daily basis. I was involved on  a volunteer basis with a veterans cause, Healing Veterans,  for several years and had the great fortune of becoming a friend of Andy Farris, the founder. With the recent passing of Andy, I knew it was time to try to assist another individual or group with their cause in supporting veterans. Along came Josh. 

In speaking with Josh’s brother-in-law, I learned even more about  Josh’s character. Not only did he find a way to offer  a salute when he was severely wounded, he  is now on a mission to become as self-sufficient as possible. It is his hope that he, his wife, and soon to be child can live a “normal life”. Most of us can only imagine the challenges he faces.

In an effort to assist Josh in his pursuit, to call attention to the plight of so many like Josh, and to pave the way to assist others, his family and friends have organized a 222 mile Warrior’s Walk that will start at Fort Stewart, Georgia on February 17th  and finish at Josh’s unit in Fort Benning, Georgia.  The plan is to raise enough money for Josh and his expectant wife to get through this situation and help defray costs for things that will be needed in their future. The list of things that are need are extensive ,very costly, and well beyond what the military is able to provide for in the way of compensation.

I would appreciate if all of my 261,ooo+ Followers on Twitter consider this cause and provide as much exposure for it as possible. I know that I will be so doing, hoping to bring some light to those who have served and to carry on the work of my late friend, Andy Farris. Let’s make the Warrior’s Walk an outstanding success in tribute  and provide a “salute” back to Josh for his service. Furthermore, if you live in Georgia or Alabama, you might consider attending the arrival of Josh and all of the “walkers” at Ft. Benning. What a tribute that would be!

For further details, please go to www.thewarriorswalk.com .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximize Your Social- A Great Primer On Social Media

It’s been a pleasure knowing Neal Schaffer over the past several years , following him on the various Social Media platforms, and owning his books. I consider him as one of the foremost authorities in the Social Media area. I’ve never been disappointed in anything he’s done and Maximize Your Social is no exception. In fact, it is his best work to date.

What initially impressed me about Neal, and why I started following him, is that his background in the electronic industry was very similar to mine. Neal, however, far surpassed my accomplishments by mastering Mandarin and Japanese. I know from experience that these are very difficult to even simply become somewhat conversant in, never mind mastering them to the extent where you can conduct full presentations in them. Realizing this, I knew that I could learn a lot from him.

In Maximize Your Social, Neal clearly points out that you, as someone who follows or engages with people in Social Media, should question the credibility of anyone who is trying to offer advice on how you or your business should use Social Media. I wholeheartedly agree, as I’ve seen my share of disingenuous “authorities” and “experts” since becoming totally immersed in Social Media over 4 years ago. He also emphasizes that Social Media is not a one size fits all and that what is appropriate for one channel may not be so for the others. You need to develop an international business mind set when marketing via Social Media. By this, think of each channel as a different country and develop communication strategies that are appropriate for each respective one that you’re involved with.

Given his strong business acumen, and experience working with very large companies, Neal is spot on with his assessment that everything within Social Media begins with a strategy. “Well defined objectives, tactics and activities… is the only rational solution to help you manage and make sense of all the Social Media activities in which your staff engages.”

I had an ahha moment in reading the book when Neal talked about PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Action). As a former employee of a major Japanese electronics manufacturer, this was something which was also ingrained in me. It is something  I know that you’ll gain a great deal of benefit from if you elect to subscribe to this way of doing business. It’s extremely effective and I want to thank Neal for resurrecting this for me and sharing it with all of the readers of this book.

Neal has not covered everything that can possibly be covered now in Social Media, as this would take many volumes of a book such as this. What Neal has done is provided the reader with a great, easy to read framework for working with Social Media and an overall strategy for employing it most effectively. He wanted to cut through the confusion and he has managed to do so with this book. I know it is something that you will find extremely valuable and a book that will be on the top shelf of your Social Media book collection, as it is on mine.

How A Brick & Mortar Bookstore Makes Selling Books Fun: A Self-published Author’s Account. By Kevin Horgan

In the Internet era, so much has been lost due to the lack of personal contact and everything being done online.  It is a genuine pleasure to get out and meet and greet people who buy your product or services. I’ve been quite fortunate as the author of The March of the 18th: A Story of Crippled Heroes in the Civil War, and to have met and spoken with those who have purchased my book. Many thanks go to the accommodations that local branches of a national bookstore chain have provided. It’s a lot of fun and something I look forward to every time.

In doing this over the past six months, I have learned quite a bit about what you should and shouldn’t do as an author in presenting your book at these locations. It’s not rocket science, but if you pay attention to some of the things that I have learned, you, too, can achieve a great deal of success in selling your book at these venues.  I’ve compiled a fairly extensive list that should be of great help.

 

DOs and DON’Ts

DO

  • Know what the first impression will be:  dress business casual, have a good display of books, and make sure there’s a large sign somewhere.  Set up your table (most stores do that for you), but you need to arrange where your work is, and how it is seen from different angles.
  • Smile.  Have fun.  Kibitz with people.  Say hello to everyone, even if they seem angry.
  • Have an attention getter as part of the display.  I give away small US flags to kids, if they drift my way.  I have a small tent desktop sign on royalty donations to be made. 
  • A couple good, tested pens, and bookmarks or business cards to go with each purchase.
  • Have flyers with important information. If the customer you engage is not interested, don’t give away an expensive bookmark or postcard.  Give the flyer.  If a person wants to think about it, give the flyer, and ask them to circle back if they don’t find something as unique. Smile.
  • You will have stacks of books.  Bring book/plate holders to display books upright at different angles.  Have some flat on the table, as these are easier to see when someone is standing there.
  • Have a wingman.  When you are engaged in the sell with a customer, this draws other people, but they have not had the benefit of your attention.  And you don’t drop one fishing pole with a bite for another, right? Your wingman sets the hook with the second customer until you can reel him or her in.

THE CONTACT

  • Your initial contact is important.  Say “Hi” to everyone. Keep that smile.  Sell yourself.  I am not a particularly pretty person.  But a smile is an invite, and eye contact counts.
  • Say hello to everyone within 10 feet.  If they are walking, it’s easy.  If they are browsing a display, say excuse me…
  • “Do you like historical fiction?”  If ‘yes’, it’ll sell.  If ‘not really’, it could be a sale if you can tell quickly why your book is different.  If ‘no’, take it as a no.  But, if ‘no, but my father likes it’, then it should be a sale!
  • “Can I tell you about the book I wrote?”  Even non-buyers want to meet an author.
  • Hand them the book.  Once in their hands, a customer will either like it or hate it.  If your cover intrigues, you’ll be able to say something pithy about it.
  • Launch into your talk.  Gotta do it in 30 seconds. 
  • The customer will play with the book, read the front and back, flip through pages.  They are listening.  Keep your pace.  OR
  • The customer will look you in the eye as directly as possible.  Hold the gaze, and finish your sell points.
  • You have to practice your talk.  On sale day, you may give the talk to four customers for every sale.  You will get very good at it.  Start with why your work is unique, give enough filler to spark an interest, even including a climactic scene (without giving away what happened).
  • Ask the bookstore people to make an announcement every half hour or so.  They usually do this without prompting, but all requests are honored quickly.
  • Finish light.  A self-deprecating joke works.  It will humanize you more.
  • Say, “Can I sign it for you?” and “Would you like me to inscribe it for you?”
  • Sip water, or have a granola bar handy.  Stand your post.

DON’T

  • Have too much on the display table.
  • Sit down.
  • Type-cast people.  What may look like a non-buyer could be a CEO who likes to dress real low on weekends.
  • Get discouraged by low traffic.  Only one location asked me to be there on a Friday night, the toughest night for a mall bookstore… movie night!  I sold all but 2 copies.  I stood there for six hours, but each book sold may be another enthused fan.
  • Try too hard on reluctant or unengaging people.  They may be carrying a burden that you don’t want to know about.
  • Be rude.  Book store people like books, and can be really nerdy.  And lonely.  Listen to it all, especially if they committed to buying the book, but if a potential customer comes by, don’t feel bad about looking over the person’s shoulder and get back to selling.  Almost all get the hint.
  • Assume the sale.  The eager listener may just like to opine.  The uneager person may buy two.
  • Take someone’s bait.  If the customer is rude, or obnoxious, smile and say ‘thanks for your time.’
  • Be too serious.
  • Drink too much water, or you’ll be away from your table and sales may slip away.  Even though there’s a coffee shop now in almost every store, this is not the time and place to be drinking from a paper cup and a dirty lid.  God forbid you spill it.

IN GENERAL

                                People like to meet authors, especially if they look like… them.  Be yourself.  If you are naturally private and introverted, take a chance and act out of your comfort zone.  Re-invent yourself for an afternoon.

                                I have a theory about customers at brick and mortar bookstores.  Half know exactly what they want, and are on a mission.  These folks are hard to engage.  The other half are killing time.  They are looking for something that peaks an interest, is reasonably priced, and may teach them something they didn’t know before they met you.

                                This customer is your target market.

                                Each sale is very gratifying.  But selling them all is tremendously satisfying.

 

“Kevin Horgan is a USMC veteran (’79-’84) and served as an infantry officer. The March of the 18th http://www.marchofthe18th.com is his first published work. He enjoys writing and talking about the book, and discussing with everyone the forgotten heroes of our nation’s history. He is committed to giving half his royalties to charities for wounded veterans, and is deeply appreciative of the support he has received for writing and marketing this historical novel. “

 

 

29 Powerful Marketing Tools For Social Media Marketing [Infographic]

I continue to be amazed at the number of tools that are available for Social Media. To be quite honest with you, it’s tough to keep up, as it seems like a new one is introduced almost on a daily basis.

Ian Cleary of Razor Social has done a great job of summarizing some of the many tools that he uses in the  infographic below. He has shown the 29 which he feels are the most powerful for those of us in Marketing. It’s not all encompassing, but it is focused. This is something which so many of us need at this time. and it might help us all become a bit more productive.

As with anything that you do in Social Media, you don’t have to go out and start using each and every tool that is suggested. Don’t bite off more than you can chew. Take a step back and determine what is really relevant. If you only need a basic hammer to fix the problem, and obtain a sufficient ROI/ROE, why go out and start using a more sophisticated tool? It just doesn’t pay for incremental rates of return. Also, make sure you master one tool at a time and then move onto the next. 

 Can you think of any other tools that Ian should have included in his daily list, but missed? What makes you most productive?

 

Razorsocial
Courtesy of: RazorSocial

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Tech Startup? Atlanta’s The Place To Be!

Atlnata-Skyline

As someone who has been involved in the Tech community for over three decades, and most of that time here in Atlanta, I can honestly say that I’ve never seen such excitement in the Atlanta area in Tech. The number of startups I’ve encountered is incredible. There is certainly no lack of brilliant new ideas. As with all new technologies, some will succeed while others will fail. What’s important is that these businesses are starting, creating new opportunities for thousands of people and generating tremendous residual value for the overall Atlanta economy.

I think what’s really unique about this time period versus years ago is that startup capital seems to be more readily available. In the past, Atlanta was often overlooked as a technology center, but now many angels and VC’s seem to be embracing the city and all of the exciting things going on. From Internet security software, mobile applications, and biotech, to financial transaction systems firms, there seems to be no loss for potential companies that may revolutionize the way we do things and benefit mankind. The only area that is really lacking appears to be in hardware based on discussions I was involved in the other night after an angel meeting. Perhaps this, too, will emerge as one of the new growth areas.

There’s certainly no lack of talent to assist in executing ideas. With this growth has come a corresponding increase in the number of Tech jobs. In fact, according to a recent study by Trinet, Atlanta now leads the nation in the creation of Tech jobs with a growth rate of  at 3.31%. This is great to see.

What’s more, there is a great deal of  buzz about what’s going on. I’d like to applaud the efforts of Wes Moss and his Atlanta Tech Edge Show which is on Sunday mornings at 11A here in Atlanta. I’d also like to thank the many sponsors of the show and WXIA TV for backing it. It’s been something which has been needed for years and is now becoming a great catalyst for furthering the success of so many Atlanta Tech companies. In addition to the media exposure, there’s also been a groundswell in new infrastructure to support what is now going on. There are many organizations and educational establishments such as the Technology Association of Georgia (TAG). the University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, Southern Polytechnical. Georgia State University, and the University of West Georgia, as well as the many other fine institutions in the area, that are committed to making things happen. Coupled with incubator and coworking spaces popping up all over the city. including Atlanta Tech Village, Opportunity Hub at 200 Peachtree Street, Strongbox West, and ROAM, to name a few, all of the pieces seem to finally be in place to take Atlanta to the next level and truly position it as a dominant world leader in emerging Tech.

Finally, with the low cost of living, moderate climate, great national and global accessibility, you can;t beat it as a place to live. I moved here form Boston over 30 years ago and have never looked back. I do miss Boston and my family and friends, as well as celebrating the World Series win by the Red Sox, but I’m looking forward to finishing out the rest of my career in Atlanta. I hope that you’ll join me. I’d like to leave you with a very well done video that was recently done in support of a new campaign called #chooseATL. I believe that this will certainly provide my followers worldwide with a sense of the gear things going on here in metro Atlanta and why if you’re thinking about starting a Tech company or if you’ve just recently launched one that Atlanta is the place to be.

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RIP LinkedIn Signal

                                                                                           

LinkedIn Signal To Be Laid To Rest

 

Like so many other features that I’ve enjoyed over the years, LinkedIn advised today that it will be “retiring” LinkedIn Signal on July 29th. Although it has been not been easily accessible over the past couple of months, if you go to www.linkedin.com/signal you can still find it.

Today’s announcement from LinkedIn was as follows:

“The LinkedIn team is continually working to improve your everyday experience across LinkedIn by adding more useful products and features for members like you. Sometimes, this means we will fold a feature into another product or retire it completely in an effort to focus our resources on creating better tools and experiences. 

On July 29, we will be retiring LinkedIn Signal. While you will still be able to look for people, companies, groups, jobs, and keywords using search, you’ll no longer be able to search for updates or access any saved Signal searches after this date.”

I’ve found LinkedIn Signal to be a valuable tool for research via keyword searches. I’ve been able to find developments on people, products, and industry topics which I’ve subsequently used for prospecting and for business presentations. Given the real time nature of Signal, it has been quite useful. I guess I’ll just have to further focus on Twitter and general searches on the Internet.

What are your thoughts on the discontinuance of Signal?

Marketing That Makes You Money!

 

MARKETING THAT MAKES YOU MONEY!

I realize it’s not your typical title for a blog post, but after having read David Newman’s book, Do It! Marketing, I’m thoroughly convinced that if you follow a number of the 77 instant-action ideas that David provides that you will see clear benefits to your business and make money from it. To me, David’s book is a well written compendium of a large number of things that I have learned in my 30+ years of marketing and sales.

As David explained to me when I discussed the book with him, “None of what is presented in the book is rocket science. But taken as a whole, or in parts, it can do wonders for your business. It represents a step-by-step process for getting things done with actionable, doable, and practical advice.” It was obvious to me that David had incorporated his marketing and sales “life lessons” into the book and it is definitely something that reflects real world experience. It is engaging, colorful, digestible, and free flowing with a number of checklists and questions to ensure the continued involvement of the reader.

By adding “Do It! Success Strategy” sidebars from 14 of today’s top marketing, social media, and sales experts, David further enhanced the relevancy and credibility of his book. Furthermore, their inclusion aligns itself quite nicely with his FLOP philosophy of  “Featuring and Leveraging Other People” and supporting them in order to ensure the greatest success of all in this social media era.

I intend to keep Do It! Marketing right at eye level on my bookcase for ready reference and plan on reviewing it from time to time to ensure that I am maintaining focus as much as possible in what I’m doing to grow my own business. With the great examples and checklists in the book, as well as its “random access” nature, it will serve as a great resource for a long time to come. I suggest that you pick up a copy of the book and do the same. Not only will it be helpful in this regard, but it will serve as your personal guide to MARKETING THAT MAKES YOU MONEY!

 

For further information on the book, or to order it, simply click on the following:

Even In The Social Media Era, Business Is Still A Contact Sport

 It’s amazing how people tend to become so enamored with Social Media, and all of the benefits attributable to it, that they completely neglect the fact that most businesses rely on contact with other individuals to close the sale. Like football, business is still a contact sport, even in the Social Media era.

 

Arkansas vs. Auburn

 

Sure you can fill the funnel and crank up the new business lead generating “machine”, but at the end of the day, human contact is still necessary to close the deal for the majority of businesses. Unless you have a business that relies entirely on the Internet for the complete business cycle, human touch, and what you make of it, will dictate the ultimate success of the business. For many smaller businesses and professional service firms, this can involve face to face meetings and actual “eyeball to eyeball” contact. For others it may involve phone conversations with potential buyers. Regardless, in these situations, the sales skills of those interacting with the prospects and/or existing customers will almost always have a bearing on the success of the transaction. 

Consider the importance of successful contact within your business and don’t put all of your eggs in the Social Media basket. Make sure that you staff accordingly and utilize Social Media and other marketing tools to fill the funnel, but ensure that you have capable individuals at the other end who can effectively interact with others and close the sale. All of the preparation and front end work could be meaningless, if this isn’t taken into consideration in your business planning.  

Let’s Stop The Gaming of LinkedIn- Keyword/Job Title Abuse Run Amuck

It’s been a year or so since I published an original blog post on the keyword and job title abuse on LinkedIn, but nothing has changed. In fact, it appears to be getting worse and LinkedIn has failed to do anything about it.  When will LinkedIn wake up and stop people from gaming the system and appearing at the top of the LinkedIn search results at the expense of others? 

Don’t get me wrong, I still love LinkedIn and have been an avid user of it for over 7 years. I greatly value it as a useful tool, but I’m now becoming ever more alarmed by those individuals who blatantly load their LinkedIn profiles with frivolous titles for basically the same job over the same time period and stuff each of these positions with repetitive keywords. As noted above, this allows them to gain a competitive advantage at the expense of  individuals who play by the “rules”.

Sure, I could do the same, and I do use keywords in strategic places to enhance my own SEO, but I have respect for  LinkedIn and for the people that use it, so I don’t go out and add keywords like there’s no tomorrow. So-called Social Media Experts are among the most notorious for doing this, however, many from other professions have now jumped on the bandwagon. Something should be done by LinkedIn to clean up these profiles and return a bit of sanity to the platform, but, also, those of us in the marketing and Social Media field should point out blatant violators. It’s time for some ethics within this field! I’m afraid that if there’s not some “self-policing”, or if LinkedIn fails to act in this area, LinkedIn’s usefulness as a search tool will be severely impacted, as more and more people learn how to game the system and negatively impact the credibility of the search results.

To show some examples of what I’m talking about, I copied portions of a few profiles out of many that I looked at and pasted short portions of them below. I have edited the headlines and other information so as not to “expose” these individuals, but I wanted to share an inkling of what I’m seeing.  Although the time frames for employment at the companies are the same, some are adding numerous titles for basically the same job functions at the same company and “stuffing” it with one or two keywords or keyword strings as shown below.

What do you think?

Do you feel we need a code of ethics?

Also, should LinkedIn police this practice and return some sanity to the use of keywords?

 

Examples Of Keyword Abuse

Example #1

2011 – 2011 (less than a year)

Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing Social media marketing

Example #2

Social Media Strategies | Social Media Content 

XYZ Company

March 2007 – Present (5 years)

Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Twitter, Social Media Marketing Facebook, Social Media Marketing Linkedin, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Content, Social Media Marketing Speaker, Social Media Marketing author, Social Media Marketing training, Social Media Marketing coach, Social Media Marketing CEO, Social Media Marketing Social Media Marketing Strategist, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing

Social Media Speaker 

XYZ Company

March 2007 – Present (5 years)

Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Twitter, Social Media Marketing Facebook, Social Media Marketing Linkedin, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Content, Social Media Marketing Speaker, Social Media Marketing author, Social Media Marketing training, Social Media Marketing coach, Social Media Marketing CEO, Social Media Marketing Social Media Marketing Strategist, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing

Social Media Marketing Producer & Video Content Marketing

XYZ Company

March 2007 – Present (5 years)

Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Twitter, Social Media Marketing Facebook, Social Media Marketing Linkedin, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Content, Social Media Marketing Speaker, Social Media Marketing author, Social Media Marketing training, Social Media Marketing coach, Social Media Marketing CEO, Social Media Marketing Social Media Marketing Strategist, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing

Twitter Marketing LinkedIn Marketing Facebook Marketing

XYZ Company

March 2007 – Present (5 years)

Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Twitter, Social Media Marketing Facebook, Social Media Marketing Linkedin, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Content, Social Media Marketing Speaker, Social Media Marketing author, Social Media Marketing training, Social Media Marketing coach, Social Media Marketing CEO, Social Media Marketing Social Media Marketing Strategist, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing

Youtube Marketing Video Marketing Internet Marketing 

XYZ Company

March 2007- Present (5 Years)

Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Twitter, Social Media Marketing Facebook, Social Media Marketing Linkedin, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Marketing Content, Social Media Marketing Speaker, Social Media Marketing author, Social Media Marketing training, Social Media Marketing coach, Social Media Marketing CEO, Social Media Marketing Social Media Marketing Strategist, Social Media Marketing Strategy, Social Media Marketing

 Example #3

Plant Controller/Senior Financial Analyst/ Accounting Manager/Controller/Cost Accounting Manager

Plant Controller/Senior Financial Analyst/ Accounting Manager/Controller/Cost Accounting

August 2009 – Present (2 years 8 months)

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 Controller, Senior Financial Analyst, Accounting Manager, Plant Controller, Cost Account Manager

Controller, Senior Financial Analyst, Accounting Manager, Plant Controller, Cost Accounting Manager

August 2009 – Present (2 years 8 months)

Controller,  Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager. Senior Financial Analyst, Plant Controller, Accounting Manager, Controller, Cost Accounting Manager.